Archives for posts with tag: game show

The nineties are making a big comeback at the moment. It seems the decade of choice to go to analyse retrospectively and plunder for ‘new’ ideas. Some are less new than others. Take the return of The Crystal Maze. It doesn’t seem to fit with any modern programming anymore – not gladiatorial or particularly humiliating like Ninja Warrior, nor that highbrow.

I have found memories of the show from my youth. I even had the board game and was jealous of my friend who had the PC game. So this was going to be a big test for me. Would I cringe at the things I used to delight in? Would they change it too much and leave me heartbroken? Would it pick up new fans?

I can’t answer the third question to be truthful. But I can the first two. No, it wasn’t cringe inducing in the slightest. There was the right balance between gentle mocking of the show and a sincere love of it to make it enjoyable. And little has changed – new games yes, but nothing that wouldn’t have fitted the original series.

Speaking of new – the big talk is, of course, the choice of host in Richard Ayoade. For me, he is the perfect fit. He has a streak of Meta in him that suits the show. “You will look different in the next room, don’t worry it’s editing” is one example. He is clearly having fun in the slightly robotic, straight-faced way he does.

It is a smart move starting the show off with celebrity specials as it allows us to settle back into the concept without fear of wooden contestants. Joey Essex was a surprisingly good booking, the interplay between him and Ayoade such a source of joy that I almost want them to have their own show.

Of course, the test will be when the show moves on to ordinary members of the public. Ayoade is an acquired taste and not everyone understands his deadpan humour. It will be uncomfortable viewing if we have an hour of the public stonewalling him. I also wonder if he will be forced to tone down some of his more acerbic comments for fear of causing an upset, which would mean the show loses one of the planks of the success the revival has been built upon.

It has to be said though that this is wondrously joyous, if tense, hour. It may not have been the bravest commissioning idea that has been made recently, but it is one of the smartest. Making TV that is fun is challenging and under-rated. Hats off to Channel 4 for looking like they have got this one right.

TV, like every other aspect of culture, has its cycles. Nostalgia is a powerful force, and a new twist on an old idea is like catnip. Take the rise of proto-eighties synth pop about five years ago. It’s not hard to see how it happens. Someone who was a child in the eighties gets the opportunity to break a new artist, and finds themselves drawn to those who mine the same cultural past as themselves.

Of course, with TV you can just resurrect the show all over again. Take Doctor Who and the upcoming return of Cold Feet. For some it is nostalgia, whilst at the same time there is also a new audience. Who would not have lasted long if it was just the fans of the 70’s watching – it needed a new generation of kids to hide behind the sofa.

Similar is true of the return if Robot Wars. I remember this fondly as a Friday night treat in the late 90’s, a bit of healthy destruction to set up the glorious weekend away from school. Those of a geeky nature could recite the weight and speeds of different machines the way other kids could list the gaps and goals of England players.

Its return recently has been glorious. The key elements are in place – teams creating robots (some good, some game but bad), the house robots a punishment for the foolish, an arena that rewards the powerful and clever. It is the simplest joy to watch.

There have been some changes – gone is the qualifying round of the assault course, replaced instead by a melee. This is all too the good, as very few of us cared if the robot could traverse a see-saw. We want to see a scrap, one with lots of shards of metal shooting off. It seems the producers agree, so the emphasis is very much on fighting.

There has also been an update of presenters, with Craig Charles and Phillipa Forrester making way for Dara O’Briain and Angela Scanlon. Again, this is a good move, as both have a slightly dry sense of humour whilst having a genuine sense of awe and respect into the time that has been spent on the creations.

Of course, what makes it all the more wonderful is that in between battles the rivalries are dropped. Many a time has a robot entered the pits post-battle missing a significant piece of kit, only for the team who destroyed it to being with to lend them theirs. This is the version of humanity I like. Everyone in the pits has time for each other. If the geeks do inherit the earth, one the main advantage is that everyone will learn to be that little bit nicer.