Archives for posts with tag: Adrian Dunbar

One of the biggest frustrations with British TV is that because it doesn’t work on a seasonal basis, the next series of episodes can come out whenever. You can easily find yourself waiting a couple of years for the next batch of episodes, regardless of the intensity of the cliffhanger.

The flip side to this is that it means what is made is done so with patience and love. It allows the writer to only send the show out when it is ready and become a gem polished as close to perfection it can be. It also creates a feeling of event TV, which is becoming increasingly rare in this era of streaming.

Line of Duty has become such an event. We are now two years on from the conclusion of the last series, yet people still flock to it. And it’s no surprise that they do. No other drama on TV can compete with twists and turns, throwing the viewer off guard. It has almost become a game working out what is being told to you straight and what is subterfuge (clue: almost everything at the moment).

One of the central mysteries is the identity of H, the kingpin of bent coppers that are aiding OCGs with their crimes. All the fingers are pointing at Hastings, our previously undoubtable Superintendent. But it is never that simple in the world of AC-12, unless this time it is. What bigger twist than to make its biggest reveal actually the most straightforward and use the paranoia of our own minds to doubt it?

My one gripe with this series is that so much focus is being placed on the UCO and the OCG and very little on bent coppers is that we are missing the beautiful interview scenes. The slow setting of the traps and the surprise table turns are missing or downplayed. Most importantly, where is all the paperwork? I mean, seriously, everyone knows we watch it for the acronyms and the evidence files and not for the explosions or gunfights!

That aside, it is still one of the best shows out there. It is fascinating watching the relationship between our central trio become tested as they begin to doubt each other. Also, it is refreshing to see Vicky McClure, previously the department skivvy, rise up through the ranks and become the de facto second-in-command.

There were initially rumours that the show would wrap up at the sixth series, but now it is potentially heading for a seventh. I hope it doesn’t become over milked. If the storylines fit six series, make it six. If it does work for a seventh, go ahead, but don’t ruin what has gone before. Event TV stops being so when the quality dips. That will be the case no matter what paperwork is done.

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I tend to find that the talked-about TV that has people salivating tends to clash with one of my more mundane pleasures. It’s not that I’m opposed to challenging TV, I just tend to want it to be a source to wind me down rather than rev me up. This is why I miss the big BBC dramas in favour of an animated comedy or panel show on some remote cable channel.

Line of Duty was one such show. Until now. Series 4 started recently, and with nothing clashing with it, I decided to give it a try. And how glad I am I did. Two episodes in and I’m already obsessed with it, to the point where I long to find the first three series and catch up so I can appreciate every twist and turn.

Not that I really need to. The new series is, in many respects, a blank slate, with many long-running threads from previous story arcs now tied up. This makes it ideal for people like me to start following anti-corruption task force AC-12. A promotion to BBC1 shows the faith being placed in writer Jed Mercurio to deliver the goods – no more is this show a cult concern.

One of the things I love is that it indulges my love of detail. A good crime drama for me always has a healthy dose of ‘procedure’ – I always want to see the bureaucracy that detectives face. Whether it be the careful recording of evidence, the team huddles where the SIO lays out the day’s agenda or the interviews that are conducted like a game of cat and mouse, I adore it. Things like this are far better than throwing in a car chase or ludicrous plot twist.

Not that this show shies away from twists. There are plenty, and all excellently executed. It’s just that they are part of a bigger picture. Clearly the audience appreciates it, otherwise we wouldn’t be coming back for more each week.

As for the cast: sublime. Thandie Newton as our villain is par excellence, playing DCI Ros Huntley, allowing pressure from above to lead to her arresting the wrong man and digging herself into an ever greater mire the more she covers her tracks. Her paranoia over her head and hand wounds give her a Lady Macbeth quality, even when she is perpetrator of the crime rather than just the encourager.

Martin Compston, Adrian Dunbar and Vicky McClure are all equally fantastic as the investigators trying to chip away at Huntley’s defences. Compson, in particular, exudes a quiet determination to get to the truth, even if he lets personal feelings cloud his judgement.

Normally, I would find a weakness or flaw, something undeveloped or not quite sitting right. But I can’t. This is as close to perfect as TV can get. Thank whatever is out there that I found it before I was too late.