Series four of Sherlock was hotly anticipated. How could it not be? The first three seasons had been near perfect, and even a slightly wonky Christmas special had more pluses than minuses, with any confusion overturned by sheer energy. This was a show that was clever, almost taxing even, but still fun and fizzy. It was like a tangy sweet that supercharged your brain.

And then came series four. Oh lord, where to begin. There have been more than a few murmurings that this season lost the plot, and I am inclined to agree to a certain extent. I will pick over the faults in a moment, but to do so I feel I need to extol what I loved about the show previously.

Sherlock is, at heart, a crime drama. It is, after all, about the world’s most famous fictional detective. Hence, what you need is a crime or puzzle to solve. The joy is watching the connections form in Holmes’ mind as it takes leaps of logic. The best episodes left you giddy and gasping for air, but wanting to do it all over again, like the most amazing rollercoaster.

This series, however, we have had two major issues. The first is that the puzzle solving has been replaced by action. Take The Six Thatchers. Who and why is answered half way through, leaving the viewer instead being carted off on an action romp. The episode was saved only by the need to resolve a second mystery of finding the betrayer. Even then, we felt as if the episode had been more of a character study of Mary Watson, in order for the ending to leave us more sucker punched.

This need for a character study blighted episode three as well, this time of Sherlock and, to a lesser degree, Mycroft and Eurus. Whilst there may have been puzzles, it was always more of an emotional drama. But I wonder how many viewers wanted this? I know of many who are walking away from the show now finding the whole thing a mess.

The second episode was, for me, the strongest, because it most went back to what the show does best. It was about how to bring down a villain. Toby Jones was brilliantly chilling and we actually got to see Sherlock’s mind working. It also, bar a mortuary scene, was gloriously un-action like. Everybody got the chance to take a breath. It helped that Una Stubbs got her biggest share of the limelight of the series as well. Seriously, how can one brilliant character be so under used?

The case for the defence is we now have a mature, emotionally astute Sherlock. His sociopathy has been blunted and his awareness of his impact on others blossoming. He is entering a new plan. There also rumours that, if we do get a series 5, we will see a return to the more equally balanced episodes of the opening series. I do hope so. People love a mystery. We are more tepid on watching introspection.

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